IT’S THE WITCHING HOUR. CINDERELLA & PRINCE CHARMING, YOUR CARRIAGE WAITS!

MadridMoney Mattersslider

The municipal government of Madrid has beefed up its fleet of night buses in an attempt
to attract night-outers: the midnight Cinderellas and their Princes Charming as it
were,
  as well as workers on the night shift. Fondly called “buhos”
(night owls), these sustainable,
eco-friendly, and cost-
effective  buses ply their routes from
23:30
to 6:00 AM. All aboard now!

 

by Rose Maramba

In a recent restructuring of the Madrid public transport network, the municipal government of Madrid, through the EMT (Municipal Transportation Company), has beefed up its fleet of night buses in an attempt to attract night-outers: party-, disco-goers, late diners, pub crawlers, and other kindred spirits, as well as workers on the night shift. Tempt midnight Cinderellas and their Princes Charming, as it were,  to leave their cars in the garage. Fondly called “buhos” (night owls), these sustainable, eco-friendly, and cost-effective buses ply their routes from 23:30 to 6:00 AM, the counterpart of the regular daytime buses that operate from 6:00 AM to 23:30.

“The night is ours,” says this Buho.

The network of buhos comprises 28 bus lines and has transported more than five million passengers in 2022, the latest record available. Today, the number of nocturnal buses has increased from 148 to 205 while the wait time at the bus stops is down from mostly 20 minutes to 15 on weekends.

Additionally, the municipal government has inaugurated two new buho lines, the Circular lines, whose itineraries are similar to those of the daytime C1 and C2 buses.

Except for the bus line N28 (Moncloa-Aravaca), the buhos start from Plaza de Cibeles, the strategic center of Madrid for offices and entertainment establishments. The buhos service Madrid’s urban centers and densely populated residential districts, taking passengers to and from their homes and/or workplaces.

Buho Line N13 at the top of its route in Plaza de Cibeles

Eight of the 28 bus lines have extended their itineraries, per the Madrid City government:

N3 (Cibeles-Canillas): From Calle de Pedroñeras to Feria de Madrid  at Parada (Bus Stop) nº 5827

N4 (Cibeles-Barajas): From Plaza Mayor de Barajas to Metro Barajas  at Plaza de Pajarones, Parada nº 5649

N8 (Cibeles-Valdebernardo): two-way routes along Calles Luis de Hoyos Sainz, Pico de los Artilleros, Avenida del Doctor García Tapia, Bulevar de Indalecio Prieto, and Hacienda de Pavones

Buho poster announcing new bus lines

N11 (Cibeles-Madrid Sur): the routes now include Calles Martínez de la Riva, Puerto de la Bonaigua and Avenida de San Diego

N15 (Cibeles-Orcasur):  From Avenida Orcasur, 49 to Hospital 12 de Octubre at  Parada nº 3898

N18 (Cibeles-Aluche): From Metro Aluche to Las Águilas  at Parada nº 373

N22 (Cibeles-Barrio del Pilar): From Calle Sangenjo to Hospital Ramón y Cajal. The new terminal is at Calle de Alfredo Marquerie (Parada nº 51008).

N28 (Moncloa-Aravaca): From Calle de Ana Teresa to Colonia Valdemarín, with the Glorieta de Maria Reina in Aravaca at the top of the route (Parada nº 3445).

In regard to the buhos servicing the Comunidad de Madrid (region and province of Madrid), click here .

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Curious about how today’s public bus transportation service in the Capital City of Madrid compares with what it was 52 years ago? See Guidepost’s “Madrid’s Public Transportation–‘Best in Europe'” published in 1972.

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Images
Featured image/Stacy Rackley, CC BY-ND2.0. Partial face blotout supplied
Buho bus and poster/©Ayuntamiento de Madrid, CC BY
Buho N13/Snooze123, CC BY-SA2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
Guidepost Cover, 15 September  1972/Guidepost