AN OUTSTANDING CLOSURE CONCERT RINGS DOWN THE CURTAIN ON A BRILLIANT SEASON

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Pinchas Zukerman/Cheryl Mazak

By Dan Lowell

 

La Filarmonica is closing their current season with another outstanding concert

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, VIOLIN & CONDUCTOR
AMANDA FORSYTH, CELLO

Program
Elgar, Serenade for strings in E Minor, op. 20
Elgar, Variations on an original theme, op. 36 “Enigma”
Brahms, Concert for violin and cello, in E Minor, op. 102

Wednesday, 25 May 2016 / 19:30 / Auditorio Nacional

 

The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra closes La Filarmonica’s 4th Season

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Nick Rutter

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Nick Rutter

This legendary group is one of the principal musical institutions of the United Kingdom, which also celebrates its 70th birthday, lands in Madrid as part of a tour which includes Girona, Zaragoza, Barcelona, Valencia, Alicante and Murcia. This concert brings to a close a season which has brought to the Auditorio Nacional other great orchestras such as the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra, Radio Cologne Orchestra, the Vienna Symphony and the Swedish Radio Symphonic Orchestra with works such as Beethoven’s “Pastoral”, “Westside Story”, Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony and Dvorák’s New World Symphony.

 

Pinchas Zukerman in his double facet as conductor and violinist

Amanda Forsyth/Mike Byalik

Amanda Forsyth/Mike Byalik

For the third time, La Filarmonica will count on Pinchas Zukerman as conductor and soloist. The Director of the Royal Philharmonic orchestra for the seventh season and heir of a great saga of Jewish violinists the likes of Isaac Stern, Yehudi Menuhin, David Oistrakh and Itzhak Perlman, Zukerman will conduct the Elgar Enigma Variations and interpret Brahms Double Concert for violin and cello with the cellist Amanda Forsyth.

One of the attractions of the concert is the program which combines a little known work with one of the most performed

The Edward Elgar Enigma Variations is one of the best known works of the composer but rarely played in concert halls. Based on a hidden principal theme, it harbors a mystery that Elgar never wanted to reveal; each one is a portrait of one of his friends (“To my friends portrayed,” according to the dedication). In juxtaposition, Zukerman and Forsyth will offer one of the best known and interpreted pieces of the repertoire for double soloists; Brahms Concert for violin and cello is included in the record that will soon to be released. The complicity of the two musicians is reflected here.